cancer prevention

12-13-year old boys in the UK will be given the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for the first time this September in a bid to wipe out cervical cancer. HPV is a common cause of several cancers. It is believed the vaccine, which until now has only been given to girls, will mean thousands of cases of other cancers will also be prevented.
Three words that shouldn't be attached to a cancer diagnosis, yet I have been repeatedly told by patients that they feel these three powerful emotions - guilt, blame and shame.
Research by World Cancer Research Fund shows that drinking alcohol is linked to an increased risk of several cancers: bowel, breast, mouth and throat, oesophageal, stomach and liver. In the UK, 21,000 cases of cancer could be prevented each year if nobody drank alcohol, but how does alcohol actually interact with us to cause such a drastic effect?
So when my latest invitation arrived a few days ago I knew instantly what it was and tore it open eagerly (which may sound surprising, but no checks for three years has left me feeling anxious - like walking a tightrope between skyscrapers without a safety net).
We have previously undertaken research which has shown that there are so many reasons behind women not attending screening and these vary across age groups, ethnicities and socio-economic groups. Lack of time, embarrassment and not understanding what the test is for are but a few.
A group of Ecuadorian villagers, who suffer from a syndrome which makes them smaller than the average person, could hold
When it comes to HPV infection, there is a kind of snowball effect. You only need to have had sex with just one other person, who in turn may have slept with another person unknowingly carrying the HPV infection, for the contagious virus to spread.
A simple, annual blood test could help prevent one fifth of women from dying of ovarian cancer, a new study suggests. A study
The majority of cancers are caused by lifestyle and environmental factors such as smoking, drinking alcohol and air pollution
After being diagnosed with advanced mouth cancer, David Barwell needed to have a tumour the size of a plum removed from his