Caregiving

If you are connected to the world of dementia care, the demands are many. In your quest to help others, are you taking time to care for yourself?
Comments are often made that we have become a 'less caring' society and that families are 'caring less'. However, the facts are in the opposite direction - families are caring more, not less, and that trend has been continuing over the last 20 years. The overall number of carers has increased by around 1 million over the past 15 years, from 5.8 million to an estimated 6.8 million. Over a decade, numbers of carers grew by 11% - far outstripping population growth.
I have Spinal Muscular Atrophy, which weakens my limbs and leaves me highly dependent on others. I have my wheelchair and I do fine on sidewalks. But batteries die, stairs show up, and I do get hungry from time to time. Now, throw zombies into that mix!
My mother was diagnosed with vascular dementia and I was suddenly cast into the role of caregiver. The deterioration was far more advanced than I had first imagined and I witnessed this cruel disease as it left destruction in its wake.
As tough as it is for a patient to receive and come to terms with a new diagnosis, it is equally traumatic on the spouse/partner, who without any prior warning or consultation, is unceremoniously thrown into the role of caregiver. Many pick up this mantle without hesitation, out of loyalty, devotion and love, take on this arduous task.
Sometimes the best thing you can do for a cancer patient is to just be there. Listen. Put aside your own discomfort and sit in those hard moments with someone. You can't take away cancer, you can't cause a certain outcome, and you can't control this. The sooner you give up the impossible role of being able to fix things, the sooner you can help.
We have a special visitor from abroad with us at present, who is taking a much needed holiday. "Why is he special?" I hear
Being a caregiver of a loved one is far from an easy task, and is probably the last thing anyone thinks of when young and falling in love. Suddenly the life you had mapped out is abruptly thrown off route and extensive changes have to be made on an emotional and physical level.
Carol Rogers, the executive director for Education and Communities at National Museums Liverpool, came up with a project
The brains in this image both belong to three-year-old children, yet the difference in size is dramatic. What's even more