children in care

Emergency coronavirus law branded "an outrageous attack on safeguards" by charities.
At the age of five, I was taken into care. At that moment, I was labelled a looked-after child and the state became my parent
Soaring numbers of very vulnerable children are being “farmed out” to live in children’s homes vast distances from where they live
When a move away from their home area is necessary children should get the support they need to thrive and stay safe. They should be able to stay in touch with family and friends when appropriate, and they should receive a return home interview.
Despite encouraging steps, the mental health crisis is not going to go away anytime soon. Not least for those who are particularly vulnerable, such as England's 26,340 young care leavers. Barnardo's runs 22 care leaver services across the UK, used by 2,000 in England, all of which aim to bridge the gap for children leaving care and moving into independent living.
We know that teachers encounter a variety of children with differing needs that must be met in their classrooms, so that every child can learn. But children in care are one of those groups of children who need particular help to learn, and who have particular circumstances in their home life that can impact on their education.
My name is Asrat, I'm a male foster carer. When I became a carer I told my youngest brother about it and he said to me, when he thinks of fostering, older women or elderly retired couples come to his mind, but he never thought younger single men would be interested or involved.
The number of young people in care in the UK has soared to a 30 year high of 94,396 - that's 145 for every MP in the House of Commons. Of course, that rise means the number leaving care is also increasing, many of them having faced unimaginable trauma including abuse and neglect.
Children in care face bigger issues than the type of school they attend - their achievement, or lack of in comparison to their peers, is rooted in bigger issues, like moving to new houses on a regular basis, moving family, and moving school many more times than the average child.
Bob and I had planned for quite a while to become foster carers and purposely bought a bigger house. Soon after we had been cleared to foster we went from zero children to three siblings, which was a bit of a shock to the system.