children's literature

But many view children's literature as beneath them. If it's not for 'grownups', it's not worthwhile. But, wait, here's a sneaky little problem: what about all the 'grownups' who read and enjoy Rowling's work and other children's books? Shouldn't we explore why these works appeals to adults who are apparently supposed to know better?
Today is Holocaust Memorial Day in the United States, so even though this day was commemorated in the UK on 27 January, it is worth pausing a moment to think about World War II. In particular, I am interested in how children are taught about it.
Roald Dahl has been voted primary school teachers' favourite author. A survey found five of his works are among their top
Literature and art more generally, must in some way draw upon the historic in order to gain sustenance. And in a paradoxical way, children's literature is more capable of this than most.
David Walliams is to go up against authors including JK Rowling and Charlie Higson as they battle to see their titles declared
2012 might turn out to be the year for gay marriage in the UK, the US and elsewhere. Will picture books and YA novels catch up with the times and start showing LGBTQ young people that marriage is an institution that is in fact open to them?
Roald Dahl's work is being celebrated in a set of special stamps. The set of six Royal Mail stamps, which also depict the
The author of Winnie the Pooh, A.A. Milne, once said that 'organising is what you do before you do something, so that when you do it, it is not all mixed up'. This coalition government has demonstrated a boldly pragmatic and non-ideological mindset since taking office. Nevertheless, there is a danger that on planning, the Government is ideologically dismissing an integrated approach in favour of extending responsibility to communities. Localism is great for running a local park, but it cannot provide integrated national solutions to the big environmental challenges facing the UK.