children's services

Study highlights plight of boy, 6, surviving on crisps, sausage rolls and fried chicken.
Yet at a time when demand for council children's services is rising, severe Government funding cuts are leaving more children and their families to deal with problems alone. We are really concerned that without additional investment in this vital early support, more families will quickly reach crisis point and the risks for the children involved will grow.
If the Government is serious about looking after the most vulnerable children in society, it must urgently re-invest in local services that are proven to tackle the root causes of neglect and abuse - not just hope it can firefight the symptoms.
Change needs to come from the top. Directors of children's services can lead by example, giving foster carers an equal voice in their fostering and adoption teams, instead of treating us like providers of bed and breakfast, as is the case too often. Respect for foster carers, no less than we deserve, is what most of us really want.
Where have children been in this election? The campaign has taken many twists and turns and ultimately has become, above all, an election about security, following attacks in Manchester and London. But there has been plenty of airtime for discussion about nuclear weapons, the IRA, Brexit, immigration, care of the elderly, the NHS, education and foreign policy.
George Lyward always insisted, invariably after a longer than anticipated by the questioner pause, that Finchden Manor, the
We have not had a general policy direction for this new Government beyond Theresa May's conference speech where she stated
What's needed is to grow the size of the sector, by design increasing the number of homes for some needs, so that members of each sub-group meeting specifically identified needs can contribute asking the same questions, wrestling with the same issues, and worrying about the same things as you are, so that they feel a little less isolated and a little more recognised.
Sir Martin Narey's review is an opportunity to stop "doing what we've always done". It's an opportunity to be the best parents we can be for the children who we take into our care system. Being the best we can be means setting aside differences we may have with our co-parents, and allocating appropriate funding to the task of looking after the child as a priority.