Christian Aid

We need to recognise that people need to survive – they should not be treated as criminals for trying to do so, Christian Aid's Karol Balfe writes
After periods of heavy fighting, the district of Al Qaboun had in recent years lived in relative peace under a truce between
This Saturday, July 9, marks the fifth birthday of the world's newest nation. This year however South Sudan won't be commemorating its independence from Sudan with the same joyful celebrations as in 2011.
Without outside help, things would be different. The fight for women's rights would falter; humanitarian assistance would be limited; access to education, healthcare, livelihoods support and employment would drop. Rural youth, who we have helped into work, would potentially be free to join opposition groups. The road to democracy and security would be compromised.
There are currently over three million people in Iraq who have been forced to flee their homes due to the violence and destruction caused by Isis and other internal sectarian conflicts. The country is also hosting some 250,000 of the millions of refugees who have fled the war in Syria.
Hundreds of thousands of Christians are being asked to switch energy tariffs for Lent, in a campaign that says it's their
Your government's pledge to fund is important to all Syrians wherever they are, but money in itself will not be enough. Host governments need to be encouraged to make policy changes that will help refugees regain hope: hope that their daily lives can be lived with dignity and hope that one day soon they will be able to go home.
Its people are resilient and resourceful, but helping them rebuild their lives is going to be a major, long-term endeavour and Christian Aid and our local partners will stand shoulder to shoulder with those hardest hit.