Circular economy

Companies respond to consumer behaviour and we need to show them there is a reason to change
A new study demonstrates how remanufacturing within a circular economy delivers a wide range of benefits for society and
Fashion and sustainability aren't two words you often see in the same sentence. An adjective that evokes images of industry and ecology, "sustainable" is actually coming into fashion when describing, well, fashion. And as Director of Denim at WGSN, I can tell you this is very good news for our industry.
We need a strong vision that brings together businesses, policymakers, philanthropists, NGOs and society when aiming at creating change. The New Plastics Economy provides such a vision. It is based on a new way of thinking about plastics as an effective global material flow, aligned with the principles of the circular economy. It aims to harness the benefits of plastics while addressing its drawbacks, delivering drastically better economic and environmental outcomes.
What if we lived in a world where we didn't own anything? I'm not talking about giving away all of our possessions and living in a yurt. I mean what if we could still enjoy all of the latest gadgets and appliances we love, and the clothing and furniture we need, but we just paid to use them instead of bought and owned them outright?
Even though Brits are known as a nation of tea drinkers, you certainly love your coffee too! Yet more often than not it's always 'to-go' with few choosing to sit down in a café to enjoy. This culture sees more than seven million cups of coffee purchased a day - and as well as a caffeine hit, this packs an environmental punch too.
Could we halt the downward spiral by using waste to solve the waste crisis? With McKinsey rolling out projections as high as $1 trillion to gain from a closed-loop economy, circularity seems to have our 'thumbs up' in principle. The truth is however, we are a far cry from adopting its practical reality in our design-distribution streams.
Marco cited one of the biggest challenges for the sustainability agenda currently as being consumer attitudes towards 'sustainable garments' and the false impression that sustainability means a compromise on design and/or quality. He is calling for a drive to help convince customers of the superiority of sustainable fashion and make it a major purchasing driver for consumers.
It all began in 1996. HRH The Prince of Wales immediately had one of his brilliant ideas when he learned of the enormous
Although it is yet unclear what these current industry players will do to make the changes necessary, one thing is certain, the next generation of fashion professionals understand the urgency for change and we, as educators, must prime them to act.