coercive control

To my particular abuser, who did many but not all of the things above, I say this. Every time I say sorry for no reason. That's on you. Every time I flinch at a raised voice. That's on you. Every time I wake sweating from a nightmare of what you did. That's on you. Every time I cry remembering the things you did and said. That's on you.
On 29th December 2015 the new offence of "Coercive or controlling behaviour in an intimate or family relationship" came into
My name is Jennifer and I am a young married mum of 3 children. I am also a 'survivor'. I often think that being a 'survivor
Life imitates art again. As Helen faces Rob in the family courts in The Archers, our Child First campaign, which is calling for radical change to the family court system in order to protect survivors of domestic abuse and their children, is going to Parliament.
When Women's Aid began working with The Archers on the depiction of coercive control - the gradual erosion of Helen's freedom, self-esteem and relationships by her controlling, abusive husband Rob - we hoped it would help increase public understanding of this sinister crime that is at the heart of domestic abuse. It has certainly done so.
It is just a shame that with this new law, the government did not provide new pots of funding to increase the knowledge base on the subject, and how to use the new powers.
Parental alienation harms children, it is coercive control of a child by a mother or father determined to use them to further their own emotional aims and objectives after family separation.
An interesting discussion kicked off in my parent's lounge today, over our Saturday morning coffee. "How is the book (Fools
December 2015 was memorable for me. I published my first book Fools' Words, a fictionalised memoir drawn from my own experience
Young people and teenagers are far less likely than adults to know where to turn for help, and research shows that if parents think they would know if their daughter was being abused by a boyfriend, they are kidding themselves. Only a tiny minority of teenage victims would tell a parent. The new criminal offence is a significant step forward.
As we await the guidance and implementation for the new offence of coercive control many are gearing up to ensure their response
On December 18 the Government announced that it would introduce legislation to create a criminal offence of coercive control. The aim of the new law is to protect domestic violence victims from sustained patterns of psychological abuse. The maximum sentence for anyone found guilty could be imprisonment for up to five years.
Today, our legal system is one step closer to being able to hold domestic violence perpetrators accountable for their crimes. It is one step closer to being able to accurately depict the true nature of domestic violence within the courtroom and further protect victims of domestic violence and their children.
What is the point of creating new laws when the ones we already have are not being used effectively? A law is only as good as its implementation. It is already possible to prosecute non-physical forms of abuse - including psychiatric injury, threats, stalking and harassment. We need to get the basics right first... I agree that the law needs to be strengthened - but not by criminalising coercive control. Instead, the government needs to abandon its gender-neutral approach to tackling domestic violence and start addressing violence against women for what it truly is - a deeply gendered crime.
The law needs to be modernised and if we are to challenge the behaviour of perpetrators appropriately, we need an offence that reflects the reality of domestic abuse in all its guises. By criminalising this form of abuse and having specialist legislation, similar to the stalking law introduced in 2012, it would send a message that abusive and coercively controlling behaviour within a relationship is unacceptable and will not be tolerated.