Cohabitation

It's been accused of discriminating against modern families.
Giving everyone the choice of civil partnership or marriage is progress, but true equality won’t be achieved without giving more rights to cohabitants – both gay and heterosexual
For better or for worse, the way we approach marriage and divorce as a society is changing. We're no longer bound together in sickness or in health, and stories of love, marriage and remarriage are flourishing in the twilight years. But if each partner chooses to go their own way, ensuring they have the correct legal protection will help make the silver split as smooth and amicable as possible.
It's no longer the case that we are vowing to stick together until the bitter end, so let's make sure that doesn't hold for our finances or homes either.
So what if there were children involved, would that change my view? I don't think so. I think our cohabitation law needs reform to recognise and protect the financially vulnerable parent out of wedlock but again, even with children, if people want to cement their relationship or give it "recognition" and/or "protection", they can marry.
The latest statistics show that the UK divorce rate has fallen by almost 3% between 2012 and 2013. The study shows that couples married after 2000 are less likely to get divorced than their parents.
Unthinkable as a breakup in the future might be, it is both responsible and sensible to prepare in the present by entering into a cohabitation agreement. This will ensure that your 'happily ever after' will not degrade into an ever-lasting legal nightmare if you ever do part ways.
The conundrum is, how can marriage be a morally superior course of action on the one hand, and an insurance policy for a statistically high divorce possibility on the other?  The two just don't quite fit together somehow.
When I lived for ten years with my children's father we had three children, and when the relationship abruptly ended, the phrase: "Well it's the same as being married" - proved to be a lie. You can tell yourself that while you are together, but don't be foolish enough to think it's the same when you are splitting up.
Fifty-six per cent of women married, most of them in their late twenties and early thirties, just as slightly more women than men became civil partners, according to another chunk of ONS material published last October.