Corruption

President Donald Trump's pardons include military contractors who killed children, law enforcement officers who violated civil rights and, of course, his allies.
The outgoing president's post-election fundraising committee could well be a legal slush fund for his personal expenses.
Separating children from their parents. Using the presidency to line his pockets. Encouraging conspiracy theories.
Trump asked Woody Johnson to see if the UK government "could help steer” the tournament to his Trump Turnberry resort.
A candidate in Kentucky vows to expose the nation's worst public pension system in a way that could reveal corruption everywhere.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was heckled at a climate change rally in Toronto by an animal rights campaigner in what has already been a tough week for the Canadian leader. Treasury Board President Jane Philpott quit in protest over the alleged mistreatment and subsequent resignation of Jody Wilson-Raybould. The former Canadian justice minister resigned alleging demotion and pressure for refusing to help a construction company avoid being tried for corruption.
Such uncritical support of the sector ignores the appalling impact that corruption has on developing countries, and shows this government is merely paying lip service to the Paris Climate Agreement
Zamira Hajiyeva is the first person to be targeted by the UK’s new anti-corruption tool: the unexplained wealth order. Hajiyeva’s millions’ worth of property and extravagant shopping sprees are under investigation.
Ending destruction and corruption is a big and arduous task - but developing technology means we can get the evidence we need to expose it