CQC

'We all need to act now and to act together. If we do not, we risk letting down children.'
In my opinion, now is the perfect time to grow telehealth services to the UK. However, this will need to be in a way that doesn't completely disrupt the way the NHS works - after all, it will never fully replace face-to-face consultations but should complement and support an already overburdened and straining system.
While the public may be aware that the government inspects health and social care services through an organisation called
The Care Quality Commission or CQC has probably one of the most important jobs in the country: to make sure that people who need care are safe from abuse. Unfortunately the evidence is that they are failing in this task and they are bound to fail because of how they are organised and how they think.
I have a friend who works in advertising and readily admits to being not that interested policy or public services. Don't get me wrong, he's cares that people receive good services, he just doesn't think about public services very much. Last week, out of the blue he said, 'I see that social care is in trouble, what's that about?'
In recent weeks condemnation has followed the news that the Care Quality Commission (CQC) - who regulate health and social
Already there is excellent end of life care all over the country, so excellence is not exceptional. It is why we do so well in the international comparisons. But excellence is a long, long way from universal...
More recently, the new inspection regime introduced by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) - the regulator for health and adult social care in England - is helping provide a better understanding of quality in hospice care.
Like hundreds of thousands of care staff across the country, I do my job well. Better than well. As with so many of my colleagues, I am always going beyond the call of duty, often in ways that no one would ever know. Covert filming might get me the credit for all those little acts of kindness that no one saw. What hurts more than the filming itself is the cynical assumption that I needed filming.
None of this will come as any great surprise. Following on from the scandals of Mid-Staffs, Morecambe Bay, Winterbourne View and others, the public are now largely conditioned to hearing about problems in health and social care services. There arguably remain more good news stories than bad ones, but of course the gravity of bad news travels far further.