Damien Hirst

We love change.  And Soho has always changed.  But it has changed because of the diversity of income groups all rubbing along together at once.  And of course we already have one Mayfair.  No one needs another one in the centre of London.
It's probably no surprise that Damien Hirst owns a lot of works by Jeff Koons. After all, these two have common ground - they're both provocateurs, both divisive artists. And now, Damien has put his own collection of Jeff Koons works on display in his Newport Street Gallery, which opened last year.
London has a new art gallery. And this one comes from the pockets - and the collection - of Damien Hirst. Newport Street Gallery is the result of Damien's efforts and commitment to put the 3,000 pieces of art in his personal collection on public display so that as many people as possible can see them.
Silkscreen prints, sculptural pieces and paintings are laid out like Stations of the Cross, around an altar, with a series of surgical images of a body scarred with stigmata-like wounds hung above the visitor, in place of the crucified Christ.
Magnificent Obsessions has a fascinating premise - to gain insight into the work of a number of post-war and contemporary artists from around the world through examination of their personal collections
For therapy 'Zadora' began to study the techniques of Haida totemic art through a close family friend. Thirty years later, Zadora's art would adorn the most exclusive collections across the globe as arguably the world's foremost gemstone artist and heir apparent to the (similarly Baltic) Russian jeweller Peter Carl Fabergé.
The solitary artist as lone figure is a relatively new archetype. The most dominant form of artistic production, a version of which thrives in this hungry market, is the studio workshop with apprentices and journeymen galore.
There is an extraordinary diversity of subjects in this top 10 list of London exhibitions for 2015. Mark these in your calendar and your brain will be like a sponge, just soaking it all up.
I did not make it to Frieze this year. And while you might think that a review of the art week that does not cover the art shown at Regents Park is incomplete, I disagree. With all that attention on art as business only, I wanted to be able to enjoy the work for what it was and not for what the price tags said it is.
The street artist lives on both sides of the fence and his grass is always green. An anti-capitalist whose biographies are littered with pound signs. A critic of the auction houses but has retrospective on at Sotheby's S |2 gallery.
As you weave between the blooming orange trees, which beguilingly give out an aroma of comforting honey in the spring, in the garden of the grand but homely house of the late great poet and author Robert Graves, you feel he'd achieved what every artist craves - an inspiring base, studio or home where you can create.
He built a name and a fortune with formaldehyde-preserved animals, live butterflies and a rotting cow head. Now Damien Hirst
In death, as less-so in life, Nelson Mandela has been dominating Twitter. And thus, this week's round-up leads with tweets
Two signed Damien Hirst paintings worth £33,000 have been stolen from a gallery in London, Scotland Yard said. The pieces
It makes sense to exhibit this kind of art in one of Soho's more rebellious corners. The space chosen by Vermilion Hook lies beneath Marshall Street in the basement salon belonging to designer and tailor, Mark Powell.
The concerts were part of the Qatar UK 2013 Year of Culture, a collaboration between the British Council and Qatar Museums Authority (QMA) to develop links across culture, education, science and sport... At a time when Qatar is coming under international scrutiny like never before, particularly as hosts of the 2022 football World Cup , initiatives like this represent an opportunity for our two countries to learn about each other.
Letting your imagination run wild is easier said than done when it has to share a space with everything else that’s going
Durham-born Neil Stokoe, a painter whose quarried face stares balefully at the world, has described his work as 'fatalistic', but he does not go far enough.
The Brandhorst Museum is a relatively recent addition to the Kunstareal (meaning 'art area'), which is home to a concentration
Is Emin right? In a world where we spend an increasing part of our lives staring at screens, could Digital Art give us a moment to "think about things we feel"? Can it rescue us from the constant commerce by communicating to us in the medium of our time, or is Digital Art simply a poor substitute for The Real Thing?