Darfur

The leaders of Africa have sorely struggled to secure socio-economic security for all for more than five decades.
"I'm described as an immigrant. But this is not my home."
Hassan Hassan was just seven years old when his father was killed by janjaweed - the militia which operates in Darfur, Sudan
Sudan's absolute impunity for ethnic cleansing, crimes against humanity and war crimes in the western region of Darfur has entered its thirteenth year. This year, the regime escalated its slaughter of civilians to the point of apparently gassing its own people.
Many of us reading this are living in a country where there is freedom of the press and free speech. Two basic rights which, tragically, have been denied to millions around the world. So if media houses have this freedom, let's see them use it responsibly, without relying on a trending hashtag, or a sprinkle of stardust to make it part of their agenda. Let's not wait for #Darfur or #Dalori to trend before we hear stories like these on our news channels.
All eyes have been on South Sudan the last couple of months- and with good reason. Two years on and still no cutting edge solution yet to end the conflict besieging the newest country, but talks will resume this month. However, the situation in Sudan is still very much unfinished business in the Horn of Africa.
International Women's Day 2014 saw, for the fourth year, the Southbank Centre organise their spectacular and diverse WOW - Women of the World festival. And on show was the good, the bad and the ugly side of feminism today.
It is bad enough that the international community averts its eyes from the state-sponsored horror that persists in Darfur and elsewhere in Sudan... We compound Darfur's suffering by failing to use our leverage in the region to ensure Bashir faces justice at the ICC.
It is a tactic beloved of despots: while the world's attention is on one bloody conflict, you can slaughter with impunity elsewhere... Since mid-December the media has watched as the world's newest nation, South Sudan, has torn itself apart. Meanwhile, its old oppressor next door in Sudan is enthusiastically grasping the chance to "end" its own troublesome "rebellion".
More than 80% of young people cannot name a single genocide since the Holocaust, new research has shown. A poll conducted