data protection

The social video-sharing app TikTok is under investigation in the UK for how it handles the personal data of its young users, and whether it prioritises the safety of children on its social network. The investigation follows after TikTok was fined a record £4.2m to settle US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) charges that it illegally collected personal information from children under 13. It alleges that TikTok is violating the general data protection regulations by failing to obtain parental consent before collecting & storing data
After around six weeks of emails, there's broad consensus that it's gotten pretty annoying - it's going to get worse
The story of Damian Green’s porn-clogged computer has several facets, with a surprising number of them related to data protection
Survey respondents were asked what challenges their company faces in becoming compliant with EU GDPR regulations. The most frequently mentioned challenge is a lack of budget (50 percent), closely followed by a lack of in-house IT expertise (48 percent) and limited understanding of the regulations (37 percent).
If 'data-is-the-new-oil' is obsolete as an analogy, Big Data companies have a choice to make. If they don't change their business models to a more human-friendly and sustainable data-is-water model, will they face becoming obsolete?
Data. We send and receive so much of it on a daily basis that we almost don't think about it anymore. As long as it reaches its destination, we don't think about what happens to it in-between, or even consider who may have access to it.
The list of things that will change when Brexit comes into effect is almost immeasurable. What will remain the same, however, is the impact of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) ruling on data regulations in the UK. Despite Brexit, GDPR will still have a seismic impact on businesses who use and store EU data.
You can buy pretty much anything on the internet. You just need to know where to look. For most of us, the only times we'd venture off the beaten track would be to find a specialist birthday gift perhaps, or a niche item you spotted on Pinterest, Facebook or Reddit. But what might surprise you is that in some places, your digital belongings could also be listed for sale - all at rock bottom prices.
Leaving the EU doesn't have to mean giving up online privacy, though. Instead, there are many compelling reasons that the U.K. should fully adopt the GDPR anyway. I personally want more security for my data, and I'm sure that almost everyone agrees.