e-waste

Faraz Sayed, a volunteer fixer at The Restart Project, shows you how to update your old PC laptop hard drive to a SSD. Giving your old computer lying around the house a new lease on life, faster processing speed and saving you money by not having to buy a new computer.
As we make our way from upgrade to upgrade, the old phones, tablets, televisions, computers, fridges, vacuums and other accessories are frivolously discarded - otherwise known as electronic waste (e-waste). Here’s what that means for now and what we might do about it in the future.
Growing up, I remember faulty appliances being fixed by either my grandad or at a local repair shop - where a man with a never-ending array of tools would get the job done. We bought when we needed, not when we wanted. We wasted nothing. And I'm not talking about the middle of the 20th Century; I grew up in the late 90's.
They're the tangible expression of the breakneck pace of technological change - a pocket-sized device more powerful than the desktop computers of 20 years ago, helping to connect people in ways that were unimaginable even a couple of decades back.
The world of IT is the fast growing one with new gadgets making way into the market every day, be it laptops, phones or personal computers. Rapid development in technology is encouraging equally rapid abandonment of old models of gadgets of personal use. All that's recyclable and considered a 'waste' is landing in Asia's or Africa's backyard.
What with all of these new and wonderful gadgets out this year, it's no surprise that some of your older tech might end up
Each year in the UK we discard over a million tonnes of so-called e-waste: all those old scanners, PCs, mobiles and an estimated two million TVs that either stopped working or have become "obsolete". Around half of these six million items could be repaired but it's usually easier and cheaper just to buy a new one.