eating disorder recovery

The campaign comes just in time for Eating Recovery Day.
I just googled "How To Measure Yourself" and immediately lots of methods were offered around measuring your chest, bust, waist, hips, etc. But is that the only measurement that counts? Surely that's only one aspect of one's self?
Healthy is defined as being "In a good physical or mental condition; in good health". But when I Google imaged 'healthy man' it showed men with six packs holding up dumbbells. Searching 'healthy woman' showed images of toned, slim women eating fruit. 'Healthy food' shows images of fruit and vegetables.
Okay, so it's cool if it works for you. But my problem is when people start imposing it on others. When phrases come up in the conversation such as "you shouldn't eat sugar, it makes you gain weight" or "you really don't need that many carbs". There are a multitude of reasons why you should never push your diet on others; firstly, you don't know their past with food.
mum bod I certainly felt the pressure to lose the baby weight quickly, and of course I ensured that I was doing some gentle exercise and eating healthy in the weeks and months after giving birth, but I no longer obsess, and there is a distinct difference between thinking about something and obsessing over it.
Eating disorders aren't about food, eating or weight but this becomes the focus. I'm not saying that everyone who ever loses or puts on weight has an eating disorder, but it can often be as a response to unhappiness. So why not give that person the opportunity to talk, to open up about their feelings. That's more helpful than a compliment.
I was determined to focus on my girls. I didn't want them to feel the pain I was feeling. But this meant I was neglecting my own grief. Who am I kidding? I didn't want to face it. I didn't choose to have an eating disorder but it became my way of coping, of controlling my life at a time when I felt I had no control.
I am, on the other hand, a firm believer in pretty much the opposite of everything this industry stands for - body positivity (EVERY body, positivity), living intuitively, health at every size, and reducing the stigma around weight, ESPECIALLY in the gym, as far too often I hear people (even personal trainers) joke and laugh about someone because of their size.
It's okay to admit you need a break. And most importantly it's okay not to be okay, and the sooner we admit this and talk about it with the people around us, the sooner we can get rid of the stigma attached to be anything but happy.
If you relate to any of this, know that it is possible to recover, to rediscover balance, there are things in place to help you and I know it's a scary step to take but I am living proof that you won't regret it; there is no shame in asking for help and no greater strength than the overcoming of inner turmoil.