Energy policy

If the policies of the two main political parties are anything to go by, the idea of a competitive energy market where consumers readily switch their supplier has been abandoned by the mainstream of British politics.
We often hear about the "broken" energy market, yet competition is increasing and it is delivering benefits for consumers.
By 2025 the Danish capital Copenhagen will be the world's first carbon neutral city, that's the plan anyway. Carbon emissions fell by around 20% in 2015 from the 2005 level. So far so good, but bear in mind this is a city which already has a head start on other major urban centres in Europe.
The Commission and national governments must include a strong gender pillar in all of their social policy, showing that the EU acts for its constituents and for gender equality and social justice.
We have what we need in the UK to transition into a renewable economy - engineering capability, R&D to advance new technologies, and a government which can facilitate policies to engage business and individuals to play their part. But is the government thinking with this long term vision in mind?
Of course, CCS may be developed by other countries, and the Treasury is probably hoping that it will prove cheaper for someone else to develop the technology and then buy it in. But, until then, policy will need to deploy renewables at much greater scale, and push industry to transform to become much more resource productive. This will be the real energy reset.
It's time for urgent action from the government to wake up to these market forces and what they mean for British consumers, British firms and British industry. We've failed to benefit from the plunge in prices; it's now essential not to be caught out by the rebound...
No-one in their right mind would design today's energy market. It is complex, confusing and counter-intuitive. It benefits energy companies, at the expense of the British public, who are routinely overcharged by expensive tariffs. It's time for the government to force retailers to charge a single unit price.
Experiments have demonstrated that young children of three or four years of age believe that covering their eyes makes them
After years of planning and protests, wrangling and reviews, Lancashire County Council's decision to reject the application for shale gas exploration shouldn't have come as a surprise. It highlighted the fact that the UK does not have a long term energy strategy, and for too long we've done nothing about it.
If Europe can deliver an ambitious and effective Energy Union, we will deliver a range of crucial goals; more independence, a secure supply of energy, a more sustainable economy, with Europe once again leading the development of green technologies. Putin and many of the other energy exporters outside the EU, who have grown wealthy on our addiction to fossil fuels, will be willing us to fail; but this is a fight we cannot afford to lose.
Scottish Power is set to feel the heat as MPs prepare to look into its alleged failure to avoid paying out as much as £79
I want us to develop greener and cost-effective energy, but the targets designed to achieve that perversely have the opposite effect. If we weren't mismanaging energy so badly, perhaps we could find means that don't cost the earth - in more ways than one.
With budgets so tight we need to be very selective about how money is spent. Policies that contradict each other and fail to deliver genuine solutions come at a cost. Rather than handing out subsidies to polluting power stations we should be creating investment and job opportunities in the technologies of the future.
Successive governments have categorically failed to listen to the warning signs vocalised by the very industry whose co-operation they're now relying on to prevent blackouts, an industry that has watched with increasing anxiety as spare capacity drops ever closer to zero...
Aside from the sneaking suspicion that this is actually a spooked Governmental response to the rising numbers of UKIP voters, aiming to stop the progress of large solar before it becomes as unpopular as wind with NIMBY voters and causes anyone else to defect, there is a far more immediate problem.
The nation's future energy security shouldn't be put at risk just because the NIMBY few shout the loudest, or because weak politicians daren't put their heads above the parapet to campaign for what is ethically, commercially and logically right
With so many separate points of uncertainty surrounding the concept of an independent Scotland, it is incredibly difficult to picture what it might look like should the nation vote 'Yes' on 18th September.
Three years on since the nuclear disaster at Fukushima: 160,000 people may never return home. The area remains a "post-apocalyptic landscape"... The decontamination operation will cost unknown billions and is expected to last at least 30 years. It is a grim legacy.