english national opera

English National Opera, in partnership with Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, has created a programme to help people suffering with long-COVID symptoms. Called ENO Breathe, the initiative uses singing, breathing and wellbeing to treat breathlessness and anxiety.
After 27 years in theatre, the idea that without doing anything wrong I could lose it all is devastating.
When everybody is trying to understand today how Jihadi John made the transition from a shy nice kid to a cold merciless killer, music composer Purcell and playwriter John Dryden already attempted to grasp such a thorny issue in the late 1600s.
The Girl of the Golden West, or La fanciulla del West, follows the lives of saloon-bar owner Minnie and a community of gold miners who are struggling to cope with the harsh realities of daily life in a bleak and unforgiving environment.
Almost 25 years later, it still remains its freshness and the same dilemmas we face today: intrigue, infidelity, disguise, jealousy and secret love are played out as the action centres on the rivalry between Xerxes and his brother Arsamenes for the love of the same woman, Romilda.
Every single element of this opera has been played to perfection and with exquisite sensitivity. It has become an instant classic.
Powder Her Face is an opera composed by Thomas Ades, with a libretto by Philip Hensher, based on the infamous Margaret Campbell, the Duchess of Argyll and the scandal her sexual exploits and subsequent divorce in the 1960s.
Peter Grimes, which opened last Wednesday 29th of January, with just eight performances, explores they way a community reacts to the different, to the others, and it shows that not much has changed over the years.
To witness Anthony Minghella's Madam Butterfly is to witness the best visual theatrical production opera currently has to offer. I therefore welcome this revival at the London Coliseum with open arms.
English National Opera's new production of Vaughan Williams's The Pilgrim's Progress highlights the company's commitment to celebrating great 20th century British opera. Yoshi Oïda's directorial debut with ENO marks the first full professional staging of Vaughan Williams's seminal work since its premiere at the 1951 Festival of Britain. The waiting is finally over.