Epilepsy Awareness

Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological conditions, affecting one in every 100 people in the UK. Epileptic seizures occur when there is a sudden surge in electrical activity inside the brain, and can result in a range of different symptoms. The cause of the often lifelong condition is unknown in most cases.
It has crossed my mind many times that it would be much easier to just not tell people I have epilepsy. But there is always that chance of a seizure, and the risk of something going wrong - or someone doing something wrong - is reduced if we all talk about epilepsy a little bit more and encourage people with epilepsy to do more. If I've decided I can take the risk, you can too.
everybody banner A few hundred years ago, people would have thought I was touched by God or the Devil. I probably would have been burnt as a witch. Luckily for me, I was born in this century so I was diagnosed with epilepsy instead.
The response to the article was phenomenal. In fact, I'm still trying to respond to all of the comments! I never expected such a huge response, I just wanted to give a voice to Epilepsy. The original article I discussed in that post ruffled quite a few feathers within the disabled community, incredibly so...
everybody banner Unfortunately, parents also have to battle and beg local services for help and equipment and, although personally to date, we've been very fortunate with our local services, I am well aware from friends and social media how the services you receive are somewhat a postcode lottery.
Living with epilepsy is really hard and it would be so much easier if people understood the condition more. As I don't have the typical tonic clonic seizures people find it hard to class it as epilepsy. I get asked all the time if I just fell but it was actually a seizure. I also have myoclonic seizures which are jerks and can be very subtle.
Laughing was never something I ever associated with seizures. Then late one night when I was heavily pregnant with our daughter, Brody was asleep next to me and began laughing hysterically. I turned round to face him and he started having a clonic tonic seizure (I miraculously managed not to go into labour).
Six and a half years ago my life was changed forever. My baby son Charlie was diagnosed with pneumococcal meningitis. It turned our world upside down when he died six days after his diagnosis. As we lay with our baby while he took his last breath we couldn't believe our cheeky little 15 week old boy had been so cruelly taken from us
It's been a rather eventful couple of weeks here. I posted on Facebook that I made it to school without my wheelchair one day. Oh how the universe laughed at me. It's all been downhill ever since. My seizures have been terrible the past two weeks.
I was diagnosed with epilepsy almost a year ago now and one of the toughest challenges for me has been looking after my two children, James (9) and Emily (5). I have atonic seizures, which means I fall several times a day