faith schools

Islamic values are not very different from British values. As a teacher I try my utmost to ensure my pupils gain British values and become good citizens of the UK. Mutual respect for and tolerance of those with different faiths is part of the British values.
In today's social landscape, where we are witnessing the re-emergence of alt-right groups, the seemingly never-ending rise of extremist groups, and an increasingly-out of touch governments introducing misplaced anti-terror schemes, surely it's never been more important to have diversity in our schools, to ensure our future leaders are open-minded and well-informed.
It is back to classes this week for most children, but although much of the routine will seem fairly familiar, a quiet revolution
A new academic year! An exciting time ripe with possibilities and promise. It is vital that schools get these all important
The time has come to strip organised religion of the privilege of being allowed to act as gatekeepers to publicly funded services. Unfair religiously discriminatory admissions arrangements need to be consigned to history and the whole role of religion in modern schooling revaluated.
Next year marks the 30th anniversary of the Education Reform Act 1988 which saw the introduction of a national curricular
Schools are the ideal place to foster a more tolerant and inclusive Britain and to encourage a healthier, more knowledgeable and sexually autonomous younger generation. Education policy that panders to religion will fall short of delivering this.
Segregation is damaging for everyone. It's damaging for the minorities who could find themselves excluded from the best schools, but also for the kids with parents of the "right" faith. Wouldn't every child benefit from mixing with a variety of children from a variety of backgrounds?
There's nothing anti-religious about advocating for secular schools that are open, inclusive and equally welcoming to all children, whatever their religion and belief backgrounds. Religion is fine for those that want it, but Britain's rapidly changing religious landscape screams for the scaling back of religious control of the classroom.
In a move devoid of any common sense, Theresa May's government looks set to capitulate to the demands of religious groups by relaxing admissions rules for faith-based academies, allowing them to select all pupils along religious lines. It's hard to think of a more retrograde policy than the facilitation of greater religious segregation of children and young people in our education system.