Fear of missing out

There is joy to be had out there in the real world, so embrace it, welcome it with open arms
The agitation and restlessness that can follow switching a smartphone off, which is punishing to witness, does look very similar to withdrawal symptoms as the individual struggles with the disconnection from 'the stream'.
Everyone keeps asking me what's on my bucket list. The problem is: I don't actually have one. People seem surprised when I tell them that. Why? Are all terminally ill people expected to have bucket lists? Do they help in some way? 
On the surface of things, it appears too easy to experience all the experiences, to feel all the feels, to dance all the dances, drink all the drinks, to gig all the gigs - to generally consume until your heart's content. But what happens when you think your heart is fully content?
In our social lives, we are über aware now of people out there, doing STUFF, having cool cocktails/cronuts/flat whites et al, while you, you saddo loner, are at home in your onesie. *glances around* Just me then?
When I first went to Glastonbury I was 22: it was the year I graduated from uni; there was a heatwave; I saw Stevie Wonder, Muse, Florence and the Machine; and I hadn't quite realised how shit the job market was going to be. In short: I had the time of my life. But this year, plagued with ever-increasing overdraft - a trip to Glasto costs between £600-700 - I made the regrettable decision to give it a miss. (Note to self: don't do that again.)