foraging

This is an easy and pretty flexible recipe. No nettles? Use all spinach. No wild garlic? Just use one small clove of bulb garlic. And of course use any deeply flavoured mushroom rather than porcini - but if you do you will miss out on the deep umami notes that porcini brings to this.
Foragers can have a lean time of it over the cold winter months but as the days lengthen, and we hear the distinctive song of the skylark as it hoovers in flight, the forager can fill his or her basket with buds and wild spring greens. The March wind may blow but wild garlic works as well in a dumpling as a sushi style wrap.
It's a fast growing tree so this will appease those with an eco conscience. America in my opinion does Christmas rather splendidly, be it decorations, films or Nat King Cole in song, roasting chestnuts over an open fire.
Stir Up Sunday fell on a day when I was on the mainland in my Angus kitchen. As usual I'd left most of the pudding bowls across in the kitchen on the Isle, so in a waste not want not fashion, I packed the excess pudding mix into a container.
Like a lot of Brits I'm leery about picking wild mushrooms. Hedgerow fruit, no problem. Wild garlic, absolutely. But in spite of the fact that I often picked field mushrooms with my dad when I was a child, I'm funny about funghi. Too many Agatha Christie novels at a formative age, perhaps, along with a yawning gap of ignorance...
With foraging schools popping up like mushrooms and wild ingredients creeping into the menus of some of the country’s leading
Hotchpotch Seaweed Sourdough Porphyra spp. or laver is a red seaweed. Although, when you spy laver on rocks, it may look
Whilst more snuggle time is lovely, it doesn't always help you feel better. You and your children need exercise and fresh air to feel energised and time outdoors in daylight is very important for beating winter blues and helping tackle SAD. So how can you fight that urge to hibernate and keep those kids active outdoors instead?
This is a cheat's version of crème brûlée, made with Greek yoghurt rather than a rich eggy custard. It's a no-bake, quick-to-make recipe, which means you can use the spare time to knock up the hazelnut twists (also very speedy) and have a classy-looking dessert on the table in next to no time.
I call the lochan by the supermarket of the Isle, Lily Loch. It never ceases to amaze me that such an exotic water plant can clog up Uist ditches and lochs. On a day when the sun shines, a lily clad lochan is heart lifting even in the breezy Outer Hebridean wind.