free speech

Journalists have rarely ranked high in the affections of the British public. Occasionally venerated for noble efforts abroad or campaigns at home, they are mostly left to languish alongside society's bottom feeders - politicians, for example, or estate agents.
Having promised that UCL would ensure free speech for everyone, not just religious-extremists, Malcolm Grant's institution now prevents an advocate for democracy and Israel from speaking on its campus.
It is so important to hate Jeremy Clarkson for the right reasons. Doing so on ridiculous grounds just spoils it for the rest of us. I say this assuming you do hate him, which I don't recommend. It only encourages him.
Poppy-burning may become for Britain what flag-burning is for the US: a hot-button issue that divides the country along what
So could the closure of Wikileaks end up generating a new type of journalist? One that has the freedom to release the other half of the story, one that has the freedom to speak the whole truth and nothing but the truth? I certainly hope so, and believe that we are seeing it already.
I am a Jesus-loving, Bible-believing, salvation-emphasising Christian, and I support freedom of speech. That may seem odd if you follow depictions of Christians of my particular tribe in the media.
The trouble in the east end of London at the weekend is evidence of English Defence League's intolerance but also the intolerance of the UAF and their unwilling to hold a political discourse with members of the far-right.
How could you not feel a twinge of sympathy for a decent chap like Jonathan May-Bowles of Edinburgh Gardens, Windsor, being sent down for simply carrying out a stunt?
Any dangerous attempts at state censorship of the press should rightly be resisted with the help of Article 10, which guarantees free speech. But whatever happens in the future, press tirades against our modern British Bill of Rights - the Human Rights Act, which protects dignity, equal treatment and fairness for everyone - will ring rather hollow from now on.