G20 summit

Can you remember your favourite teacher? The person who introduced you to a still-cherished book, flicked a switch in your brain, or ignited a passion that years later still burns strong and bright?
Last week, China handed over responsibility for hosting the annual G20 Summit to Germany, where 20 of the world's most influential
In September, there were two summits that were supposed to turn the tide of the refugee crisis. World leaders came together; first, for the UN Summit for Refugees and Migrants, and, second, for the US Summit for Refugees hosted by Barack Obama. We were told that they were going to change the way the world helps the 65 million people in the world that are forcibly displaced.
Talking about interests of the people, do the Chinese people not deserve the basic civil and political rights such as freedom of speech, freedom of association and freedom of assembly without being charged with "subversion"?
From Stockton South, to Rochester and Strood, voters across the political spectrum are united in the belief that it's wrong for the NHS to be part of an American trade deal. It's time for the Prime Minister to listen. Britain won't be fooled by vague assurances over the NHS. The only way to ensure our NHS is protected from this trade deal is to remove it from these talks entirely. It's time for the Prime Minister to show some backbone. Cameron must use his veto and exempt the NHS from this deal.
As they clear up the convention centre in downtown Brisbane, Australia and take down the banners and start returning the city to normal, this is the ideal time to reflect on what exactly hosting the G20 leaders meeting has meant for Australia, and moreover for the global community.
The global financial system failed in large part because it only served rich countries - and within rich countries, it served rich people more than everyone else. In order to build a better system, we need to make the interests of those who have been excluded from our top priority. If large developing and emerging countries are to play a constructive role in this process, they must stand in solidarity with poor countries and with the poor in their own countries. To do otherwise is to condemn ourselves to a never-ending cycle of boom and bust - with the poorest continuing to suffer most.
Trafficking continues to be a global epidemic, with 600,000-800,000 men, women and children trafficked across international borders each year. Approximately 80% are women and girls. Up to 50% are minors. (US Department of State Trafficking in Persons Report 2013).
It is hard to think of two countries that have more in common than Australia and Britain. We share a language and a rich history - and, in the main, a sense of humour. We are both maritime trading nations. Australia inherited many fine British institutions including parliamentary democracy and the common law...
Much is written about Russia and about doing business there. Understandably there is a tendency for the media to gravitate towards more controversial stories - as last week's G20 highlighted.