Gary Numan

The 'Cars' singer cancelled his show in Cleveland following the tragic accident.
Gary is one of electronic music's most celebrated pioneers.
For the latest in our WISE WORDS interview series - where stars from a whole range of fields share the important life lessons
It was an honour for myself to find out where Gary's own head was at in an interview 25 years on from my first experience of him, and to discover what a cordial and unpretentious interviewee he was, notwithstanding his decades of experience in a cut-throat music business that has beaten him down as much as it has elevated him.
This week Android In La La Land, the documentary on seminal electronic musician Gary Numan, hits cinemas in the UK. I met up with the director Steve Read to get the skinny on the making of the movie.
What is of most interest to someone like me, who found the image of being an Numan fan so helpful as I learned to love being disabled, is that it charts Gary's diagnosis of Aspergers Syndrome, which obviously influenced his image and attitude through out his career, and his battles with depression and anxiety as he struggled to rebuild his career.
Anyone who remembers the late 1970s and early 1980s will know the name of Gary Numan, the man who turned the synthesizer from a art house noise machine into a mainstay of the music industry and led to a revolution in how music is made
Anyone who remembers Gary Numan from his heyday will picture a cold, distant robot like character who sung of alienation and a dark future. While the songs of alienation are still key to his art, the man himself now takes on the persona of a preacher spreading the word to the converted.
Gary Numan worries he won’t be a good father to his children. The 80s idol, who recently moved to California with his family