George Orwell

At the very least, the president sees the same world and shares the fascist state of mind
In George Orwell’s 1984, Winston Smith, a nonconformist working at the Ministry of Truth, commits the worst of thought-crimes
In George Orwell’s 1984, Winston Smith, a nonconformist working at the Ministry of Truth, commits the worst of thought-crimes
Sometimes I think that, as individuals and as a species, it is not until we are pushed to the brink, that we find the strength to evolve beyond our limited viewpoints and ego. The alternative is almost too unbearable to contemplate - the potential annihilation of human civilization and the destruction of life on an unprecedented scale.
This isn't the place to recount all the terrifying new policies, or comment on the potential disastrous consequences. Instead, I want to invite you into a new world with a glimmer of hope, hidden away in your local library, or children's school.
In the three days since Kellyanne Conway described White House press secretary Sean Spicer's lies as "alternative facts" on
George Orwell's novel '1984' is back as a bestseller, 68 years after it was first published, thanks to Trump.
Forget the Euro, dollar, pound or even the Smackeroony - cynicism is the new currency being traded across the world. And
I learnt what a white lie was in a Sainsbury's car park when I was about seven. Someone asked my Mother whether she had any