How The Light Gets In

The festival features 200+ events, hosted from London, New York and Delhi. Here's how HuffPost is involved.
The success of the so called '1%' - bankers, financial speculators and entrepreneurs who control so much of modern wealth - is clearly visible. But what should the response of politicians be to growing inequality? How can we reconcile the obvious need to grow the economy while ensuring the weakest and most vulnerable in society do not get left behind?
It was in 1900 that Lord Kelvin, renowned British scientist and the toast of the establishment, addressed a group of physicists
The invocation of a higher dimension only generates a global flow of time, so it does not explain the sense of individual identity associated with the 1st person perspective. To accommodate this, one may need to account for another important aspect of consciousness: we cannot be aware of timescales which are too short or too long.
Until we rethink where we are now in society, in our political and educational lives, we are living through groundhog day, treading water. We are marking time, and we are not going anywhere fast around dismantling poverty.
Going to 'Hay' doesn't just mean going to the Hay Festival. The 'Hay' experience has become a sum of its parts. When people ask me what 'Hay' is like, I don't just detail the many authors and experts you can see (wonderful as they are), I tell them about the town which positively buzzes during the eleven day period.
I'm stating nothing new when I say that imagination is the most powerful tool humankind has. Imagination has put man on the moon. The 'fantasists', science fiction writers and film-makers did it way earlier than the 'realist' scientists, but one certainly fed into the other.
At the bottom of our fixation on goals, I suspect, isn't a simple desire to get things done, but a deep discomfort with feelings of uncertainty: once we've set ourselves firm goals, we get to pretend that the future is certain.
When we debate Trident's future, we would do well to recognise that although we no longer live in direct fear of nuclear weapons, as the older ones of us may remember from the Cold War, the risk and threat still remain as powerful as ever.
Responding to a failing economy, rising parental stress about our children's economic futures and policymakers' obsession with the link between education and social mobility, reforms to our education system have reinforced a traditionalist approach to learning, and childhood.