humanitarian crisis

Following the collapse of the previous government and severe international sanctions, the country's humanitarian crisis has only deepened.
All foreign military forces are expected to leave the country next week – and there's already been explosions.
This decade brought us Trump and Brexit, creating a fractured political landscape that presided over a world facing humanitarian crises. In the UK, terror attacks at the Manchester Arena and London Bridge shocked the nation, while around the world conflict killed hundreds of thousands, from Boko Haram to Islamic State.
Venezuela’s descent into chaos, which nearly culminated in an anti-government military uprising, has had profound effects on both sides of the border.
'The world's worst humanitarian crisis.'
Syria remains the largest humanitarian crisis in the world - but aid alone is not enough
'Shoot!' yells Karina, a tall, athletic 15-year-old Burundian as she launches a ball in my direction. I grab it, go for the
You can see that the refugees are self-sufficient and stoic, and that they are determined to help themselves. While this independent spirit is essential in the chaos of the first few days, it will be down to NGOs like Islamic Relief, for the most part, to provide them with improved shelter units, water, sanitation and food.
Images of thousands of refugees fleeing Myanmar have quite rightly focused global attention on the human tragedy of displacement and the search for safety. However, there is another story here, namely the scramble to deliver aid to over 400,000 refugees - the population of a small city.
Last month the Inter Agency Regional Analyst Network (IARAN), a consortium of NGOs, private and academic partners, published a report about what kinds of crises we can expect until 2030 and how the sector needs to adapt to best respond to the needs of people most affected. What does the world look like in 2030? According to the IARAN there are 9 types of crises we can expect to see...