Istanbul

Beşiktaş supporters displayed their support for the Ferguson protests in Missouri during their Champions League clash with
Neil Young chose mostly songs of love and conciliation at his first-ever concert this week in Istanbul. Like the rare July rain that fell, the sentiment was a relief from the violence that smoulders throughout the region.
Part of Istanbul has been turned into a war zone after riot police unleashed tear gas and water cannon on protesters that
"What am I waiting for?!" I'm always waiting on something; a man, a deal, a friend. Not least of all waiting to travel to places I've always wanted to see. Fast forward 10 hours and I'm en route to the land that joins the East and West.
The Turkish prime minister has moved to silence anti-government protesters responsible for multiple demonstrations in recent
For the second evening, the two biggest cities in Turkey have descended into chaos after police fired tear gas and water
Some may argue that a city museum in Istanbul would be redundant. Istanbul is itself a living museum, they might say as they trip over unmarked relics and ruins that literally dot the streets here. But this lets people off the hook for the wholesale destruction Istanbul has faced on a near constant basis since, well, always. Istanbullus like to eulogise their city but don't seem particularly interested in preserving it.
A severe Istanbul hailstorm forced the abandonment of Galatasaray and Juventus's crucial Champions League match on Tuesday
A 22-year old woman has been arrested after allegedly trying to sell her baby at Istanbul’s airport to a German couple of
The biennale, the city's most important contemporary art event, was to originally go on show in public spaces, including Gezi Park, that are slated for demolition amid Turkey's frantic urban-redevelopment boom...
Despite a shaky economic past which saw the country go through a period of instability - involving the devaluation of the Lira - things have very much taken an upward turn in Turkey and this is a very positive thing for TEFL teachers.
I turn back into the main street and approach the riot officers. "What are you doing here? Open your bag!" shouts one of them. "I'm a journalist," I say, waving my press card. He grabs my arm, opens up my bag and pulls out my gas mask: that's all the proof he needs.
It's late evening when I receive a text from someone I was sitting with earlier. "Police are coming, things are starting, watch out, we're running..." In front of me in Taksim Square, riot policemen are assembling alongside the infamous 'TOMA' riot control vehicles. Between them and thousands of heckling protesters, a group of activists are joining hands to form a human chain.
The handcuffs are digging into my wrists. To my left a riot policeman is rough-handling a young detainee who can't stop crying. It's hot, I haven't eaten for hours, and I don't have my press card. Istanbul was supposed to be a stopping point on my way to visit my grandparents. I never thought I'd end up in police custody in front of a man insinuating that I was linked to a deadly bombing.
For the past three weeks, the park, along with the square, has become a hub of activity, with thousands of encamped protesters confronting water cannon and tear gas-wielding riot police. But despite the harsh rhetoric and the violence, the reality is that Prime Minister Erdogan has little to fear.
Further clashes have erupted on the streets of Ankara and Istanbul as the Turkish prime minister held a huge rally in front
Istanbul's Taksim Square, the scene of restive anti-government protests, has been sealed off by police after demonstrators
Hundreds of Turkish police clashed with protesters in Taksim Square, Istanbul on Tuesday. Rioters attacked the authorities
Turkish police used tear gas against the protesters in Taksim Square on Tuesday as protesters unleashed Molotov cocktails
Turkish police have stormed into Istanbul's Taksim Square, firing water cannon and rubber bullets into the air, leading to