Jewish

Ian Levitt Attorneys laid the charges at Sandton police station against Muhammad Hattia, Tameez Seedat and Matome Letsoalo.
It seems unlikely that the period were Jewish boxers were the envy of the world will not be repeated. One hopes that the historical significance of those boxers is not forgotten and their legacy is celebrated as triumph against adversity.
Last weekend, as I co-chaired Britain's first ever Jewish/Muslim conference with my 'Muslim sister' Julie Siddiqi, I saw
In an administration in which racism has gone mainstream, it should be no surprise that Jewish minorities would be no exception. The last week of February saw 21 bomb threats to Jewish schools and community centres, alongside vandalism across the country, including the desecrations of Jewish cemeteries in St Louis, Philadelphia and Fort Wayne, Indiana.
When media changes, the world changes. We live in a world where the Pope and the President are on Twitter and Rabbis communicate on Facebook. We live today in a time, which some call the Fourth Industrial Revolution. A period which is distinct in the speed, scale and force at which it transforms production, distribution and consumption.
I am listening to the concerns of Jewish students and the Jewish community and want to offer reassurances that I will do all I can to combat antisemitism. As I've said before, I regret that my choice of words in the past has been interpreted as otherwise.
As a Jewish student who has experienced online anti-Semitic abuse, the urgency of the report initially seemed comforting, a call for all those fighting against racism to stand united. Reading the report however, I was dismayed to detect severe shortcomings and underlying bias.
Eighty years ago, on October 4th 1936, the local community involved in the Battle of Cable Street had little understanding of the impact and lessons the day would have in shaping the fight against racism and fascism for the future.
If we want meaningful integration in our diverse society, we must have it in our schools. All the available evidence supports this claim. It is a truth which should have led to significant reform of England's education system a very long time ago indeed. Instead, it has barely figured in education policy.