long term illness

No one should have to pay for the privilege of having a long-term condition they certainly didn’t ask for
I listened to the crying every night but one night I heard the father opposite sobbing. His child was getting worse. Doctors and nurses rushed in, discussing next steps. At that moment, a flash of insight hit me: this pain is universal. It's not personal, it's not mine alone. That's just the way things are.
hope with everything in me that one day this won't be the case, and those with chronic illnesses, including those without mobility aids, will be able to sit in reserved disabled seats, or move their legs in their wheelchair, or God forbid, laugh and enjoy their life, without judgment from others. But for now, we need to do all we can to help the healthy population to understand; just because somebody doesn't appear to be ill, it doesn't mean they're not suffering.
There is no evidence that the work ethics of people with long-term sickness are any worse than the average person, and in some respects they are better. Studies frequently find that the long-term sick want to work - which is not the same as being able to work, but does show that fecklessness is unlikely to be the problem here.
Generally people don't want to hang around anyone chronically ill, and I can't say I blame them. I do understand, for someone in a poor state of health has limitations when it comes to socializing, which admittedly causes difficulty in maintaining friendships. Once diagnosed with a degenerative disease, life is never quite the same again.
As a Parkinson's patient, I am addressing the issue of "Who is taking care of the caregiver?" If you are a caregiver, I am speaking directly to you, for looking after yourself is vitally important if you wish to continue taking care of a loved one with Parkinson's or other serious long term illness.