Midlife crisis

In her new book, “Why We Can’t Sleep: Women’s New Midlife Crisis,” author Ada Calhoun explores massive debt, Gen X childhood trauma and perimenopause.
When I think about the future and things I have to look forward to, I was genuinely excited about the day I could officially
On Tuesday, as I'm inspecting my navel (see past and indeed future blogs), out of the blue I get a call from the head of HR at the company that has been my main employer for almost four years.
Back in 2007, Oliver James offered a searing critique of advanced, largely capitalist societies and how their systems impact negatively on the mental health of the people within them. His contention is that emotional distress is best understood as a rational response to 'sick' societies, where education and upbringing are geared towards making progress.
It's hardly surprising that many of us in our late forties and fifties end up either dreading the years to come or railing against them by trying to pack as much in as possible (younger lover, ultra-marathons, sports car, botox, face lift, breast implants, you name it).
Our friends at Public Health England announced yesterday that mid-lifers are doomed to heart failure and dementia because we don't make time to exercise and eat healthy food. Thanks for adding to my woes, I think as I unwrap another KitKat. I'm 45 now and counting the days till my next birthday.
Three hours a day, five days a week, twenty days a month. That's sixty hours being penned in, thinking you've had a right result if you managed to get a seat, even if it was beside a sweaty reprobate with the personal hygiene standards of a sumo-wrestler on a dirty protest in a Bikram Yoga session.
here is nothing wrong in having a preference for how we would like our life to be. But rigid single mindedness can lead to vulnerability, when life and those around us do not deliver. We may not have the necessary mental and emotional resilience and agility to bounce back and adjust accordingly. If we are less accepting of the value of others' difference, then we may find it hard, if others struggle with our own difference.
Of course my life since then hasn't been a disaster, and you can't sift out and keep the good bits. I enjoyed my university education, despite being a long way from home and abjectly failing to make any friends. I'm happily married now, and I can't separate that from all the other choices that I've made.
So for now, it's back to my temp job ( I'm sat here now with nothing but this computer, my phone and people walking past this reception desk either ignoring me or being told "I smell delicious" by an old man), and some good comedy gigs to look forward to. Have a good weekend and if you don't enjoy your job, walk out. NOW (you won't regret it).