Mobile Apps

Social media is an undeniable part of travel. From reading blog reviews of where to stay, to getting that all important Snapchat at the beach, many of us will continue to check in to our social networks throughout our holiday - and hotels are taking note.
In the golden age of app development way back in 2008, anyone with a knack for coding could develop an app, release it on to Apple's App Store and wait for the cash to roll in. Probably the most famous example was in 2008 when Joel Comm, the developer of iFart Mobile, a crude app that made, yep, fart noises, was earning Comm $10,000 a day.
For years I've been aware of a cool app that allows you to text while seeing where you walk to prevent accidents like falling over... Though despite it being around for years, the integration and adoption of some technologies require a tipping point before they become mainstream.
Boris Johnson made one of the most awkward admissions possible at the launch of a new tech workspace in London: he not only
I first saw David Bowie in Torquay in 1972, in a venue for 500 people with tickets costing £1.50. It changed my life. Forty years later I'm still struck by his youthful talent, innovation and longevity. He created a revolutionary sound and style building on the best offerings of the 1960s London artistic scene.
Flappy Bird didn't break the App Store. EA's Dungeon Keeper isn't an anti-game. And the people who play(ed) them aren't doing so against their will, or in contravention of natural justice, or in a sort of mindless stupor.
Change is a common process that happens throughout all our lives. It's necessary and important - it has to happen, regardless of what we think. Sometimes, we have no say on what changes and how it does that. It's easier to accept it and change with it.
110 developers rocked up to One Canada Square, Canary Wharf recently for the London-leg of the PayPal search to find the best hackers across ten of the world's coolest cities.
As our information and communication technologies evolve, they redefine the ways we learn. Not only have the technological tools of the 21st century transformed the content of our educational landscape, but they have also sparked a revision in the actual processes through which we think and solve problems.
Why is advertising a dirty word in mobile? Ask a handful of people to describe mobile advertising (or indeed any advertising) to you and they are likely to describe a world of annoying, irrelevant spam that adds little or no value to their lives.