multiculturalism

A study claiming four in 10 people believe multiculturalism has undermined British culture is just another reminder to the UK's minority ethnic communities they will never be British enough
As it's revealed four in 10 people believe multiculturalism has undermined British culture.
I'm a serial entrepreneur and the founder of a global digital education content company, specializing in cross-cultural issues. I also happen to be a minority female from a traditional culture. I mention that fact last because it's the least relevant reason as to how and why I became an entrepreneur and how I run my business.
For the Left to reclaim Englishness cannot be done by ignoring the diversity of the working class it's seeking to appeal to, nor by simply erasing what Englishness meant to many people. It means understanding that this identity meant many things, some were good, but many, unfortunately, were not.
Most schools have their own definition of what it means to be internationally minded. Policies have been written, curricula
Religions are really about the community and the people connecting behind the scenes. It's about coming together and sharing an experience, whether it's fasting together for Ramadan, singing hymns together in church or meditating together in a temple. It's about knowing what to do and where to go in times of need or change. Londoners can do this. We can figure this out.
Being South-Asian and Muslim are not to blame here, I'm merely acknowledging that as a female, South Asian Muslim, my intersecting identities have enabled me to notice gender inequality first-hand and experience the troublesome nature of sexual politics that have affected women for generations and are still affecting many of us today.
I believe characters in stories should be as diverse as the people who read them, but only a very small handful of children's books feature a deaf character. There are more than 45,000 deaf children in the UK. Most are born to hearing parents and go to mainstream schools where they may be the only deaf child, so they can feel quite isolated.
banner The problem is not that we appreciate beauty but that the definition of beauty is so narrow, too narrow to include afro textured hair, so while society is waking up to the damaging effects of its narrow definition of beauty, advocating for body acceptance, even skin colour acceptance, hair discrimination still goes largely unopposed.