neuroscience

Exercise causes profound changes in brain structure and function and these changes can have really important effects, both in the short and the long term, on our mood and our mental abilities. In this episode cognitive neuroscientist Dr. Tom Bullock explains how exercise supercharges our decision making, the surprising possibility of why we get an exercise ‘high’ and how it can help restore the brain as we age.
Sleep has remained a mystery throughout the history of neuroscience and it isn’t until recently that technology enabled us to see what’s occurring in the brain when we sleep. In this episode of HuffPost’s original series on the inner workings of the mind, neuroscientist Professor Jeff Iliff explains why it’s important to get a good night’s sleep and how it helps the brain function better.
Maybe it’s true that money doesn’t make you happy - but doing without can make you distinctly unhappy
Science is a tool, which has been used to help commercial industries become more effective and productive. Its influence is everywhere from engineering, manufacturing, technology to athletics. Catapulting each industry to a higher realm of thinking as well as innovation.
I haven't been doing any blogs for many, many moons (I hope you noticed) because I've been busily ensconced in writing my
I attended the Attachment & Trauma Conference (12th-14th May 2017) in London, along with 1200 other individuals. I found the developments in neuroscience and its application to therapy fascinating and reassuring, if at times too complex to fully take in! Dan Siegel (1) talked about integration being;
Conventional wisdom has it that humans have a poorer sense of smell than most other animals. Sure, we can smell - most of us appreciate the aroma of our morning coffee or a delightful fragrance, and we're able to detect burning toast or a gas leak. But we have nonetheless long been thought to be relative weaklings in the animal kingdom's league of olfactory excellence, which puts dogs and rodents near the top.
Light has become a unique point of interest within the built environment on three fronts; sustainability, mental health, and
Laughter and the appreciation of humour are vital components of adaptive social, emotional and cognitive function. Surprisingly, they are not uniquely human. Primates and apes also enjoy a good chuckle.
Is meditation total BS? originally appeared on Quora - the place to gain and share knowledge, empowering people to learn