nhs cuts

Among all the cost-cutting in the NHS it's vital that we safeguard the futures of community pharmacies and the pharmacists who carry out such important work.
NHS spending on private ambulances has risen by more than a fifth in two years to more than £78 million, new figures show
While Theresa May toured the TV studios during the General Election campaigning promising to deliver a fairer society, her Health Ministers were hard at work drawing up a new hit list of fourteen areas across the country which will face a fresh round of NHS cuts.
With the mental health service functioning in a deprived state, we as GPs will have to fill in the gaps. Regardless of whether we have the appointments to accommodate this, do we even have the skills? And can we safely evaluate risk in a 10-minute consultation? All of this leaves me unable to shake the sense of foreboding during my mental health consultations.
I have two twin sisters. They are kind (selectively to me of course as I am their sister); intelligent and though being a good person is more than this, and being a woman is much more than this; they are beautiful inside and out. They were also born premature. Devastatingly so. 10 weeks to be exact.
Elections create winners and losers. Politicians like to claim that their policies will benefit everyone, '[e]very person, every family, every business, every community the length and breadth of the United Kingdom - England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland', to quote Theresa May. Sadly, this isn't the case.
If the government does not change course and listen to frontline pharmacists desperately trying to make them see sense, I foresee a desperately bleak future for community pharmacy and indeed the whole of the NHS - a hole in the high street and in the chain of healthcare that will never be filled.
I didn't know it was World Mental Health day when I booked a rare GP appointment last autumn. I found out later, after I'd emerged from my ten allotted minutes with the clock-watching locum, clutching a prescription for Citalopram and feeling surprisingly peaceful at having finally said it out loud...
My cancer has made me a more anxious person, compared to the incredibly confident young woman I was before. Nothing ever worried me. Now I get upset easier. I've had a big reality check. But I'm working, I'm living my life, and as you read this I'll be fulfilling a lifelong dream by travelling around Asia for three months with my best friend. This is what I should have been doing when I left university. This is why I've been so frustrated.