niqab

The funniest part of the cover is that most Westerns always talk about how oppressing hijab must be and how we, Muslim women, need to be freed from such oppression, but the first thing they decide to put in a photo-shoot to look artistic and ethnic is our hijab.
I grew up wearing the face-veil as an act of worship. I live in a liberal, secular society that is politically charged and highly divided. For me, the face-veil has multiple meanings and dimensions; it is not reduced to "a piece of cloth," nor is it exclusively a religious symbol.
The Dutch parliament has voted to ban the niqab in certain parts.
When Nigel Farage complained about the number of foreign languages spoken on public transport in Britain he probably didn't
Let's be clear: wearing a niqab is not regarded as a religious requirement by the vast majority of Muslims. Even in President Rouhani's Iran, women do not cover their faces. It is a cultural tradition with its origins in the Arabian peninsula, exported by preachers who follow the teachings of wahhabism.
Others criticised the article, saying that it misrepresented Dewsbury. Legion176 posted: “Nothing the DM likes better than
For many the face veil is a symbol of the oppression of women, for others it is a question of religious observance. In court however the question is fairly straight forward: How to achieve a fair trial for both the prosecution and the defence? Judges have to enable witnesses to give their best evidence and juries need to be able to assess those witnesses properly, not from behind fabric.
Intolerance breeds intolerance and laws that allow bigotry and racism as though they were a part and parcel of society are exactly the thing that encourages such attitudes. When we look at injustices far and wide it's so easy to express distaste but we must look closer to home and deal with the injustices and attitudes that are being imposed.