osteoporosis

It is true that our minds can stay younger in self-image than our bodies stay in physical form.
Find what it is that makes you feel good afterwards
Last week marked World Osteoporosis Day - a condition that affects over three million people in the UK. It is characterised by changes to the structure and density of bones, making them thin, weak and prone to breakages.
Worryingly, the trend is greatest in our young generation of 16-24 year olds who are shunning dairy at the fastest rate, despite needing it the most during their strong bone-forming years to prevent health issues such as osteoporosis or thinning bones later in life.
In many ways, the meaning of the word 'cost' to me is the 'cost' of losing my independence, my ability to walk, my hard-earned career and the 'cost' to my partner and family of my intense, chronic pain needing continuous care. But there is also a financial cost to being disabled that I never even thought about before, but that very quickly became apparent.
As with all parts of the human body, looking after your bone health is vital. Not only do bones provide support and structure, but they also protect our organs, anchor our muscles and help regulate our calcium levels. Bones are constantly broken down and replaced.
'We are facing a future where broken bones will become the norm.'
If you’ve ditched cow’s milk you could be damaging your health. That’s according to the National Osteoporosis Society (NOS
Yeah, eating asparagus does make your pee smell. However, once you're past that, there are numerous reasons to fill the plate