Parkinson's UK

I found myself answering the door with a blank look on my face and no knowledge of the person standing in front of me
Tapeworm infections are increasingly rare in the UK, despite being fairly common in other parts of the world, but drugs used
Could diabetes and Parkinson's be treated the same way?
A drug commonly used to treat type 2 Diabetes has successfully stopped Parkinson’s in its tracks, leading scientists to believe
200 years since Parkinson's was first recognised as a condition, science has unlocked key discoveries that could transform lives. Now, this innovative new way of working will enable the charity to help harness these research discoveries and help find a cure in years - rather than decades.
This week is Parkinson's Awareness week and I will be blogging about my experience as the partner of a person with Parkinson's. My fiancé Ryan was diagnosed in 2015 at 36 with Early Onset Parkinson's Disease.
Today, we're saying that we won't wait any longer to deliver better treatments and a cure, faster. That's why Parkinson's UK is spearheading, with the expertise of the research community and the support of people with Parkinson's, the revolution needed to take promising treatments out of the lab and into doctors' surgeries.
In light of the recent publicity around the ongoing crisis in social care, Parkinson's UK Chief Executive Steve Ford explains
As an organisation we exist to make life better for every one of the 127,000 people living with Parkinson's in the UK. By listening to and understanding their needs and experiences we can better support and empower people with Parkinson's to feel more in control...
I took a very different approach to my dad and told people straight away when I was diagnosed. I have met many people since within the Parkinson's community who have delayed telling people for years but I don't understand it, there shouldn't be a stigma attached to having Parkinson's.
'How long are you likely to have Parkinson's then?' Philip would have been pretty surprised if a friend in the pub asked
People with Parkinson's have told us they've been stared at, had their symptoms mistaken for drunkenness, and even been laughed at in public because of their symptoms.
From January 2013 to December 2014 people with Parkinson's were subject to over 3,300 avoidable medication errors in hospitals across England. Almost 600 of these caused discernible harm including increased pain, severe rigidity and hallucinations.
We've been struggling for decades to find the answer - a definitive diagnostic test for Parkinson's. So far brain scans, blood tests and urine samples haven't come up with the goods. As a result there's often doubt, and even error, in Parkinson's diagnosis, particularly in the early stages.
This chronic lack of information and support is leaving people with Parkinson's feeling discarded and deserted at the toughest time of their lives. This is simply unacceptable.
I've heard from people accused of being drunk, refused service in supermarkets, ignored by taxi drivers, and even arrested by police at the Olympics for not smiling (lack of facial expression can be one of the signs of the condition). This simply has to change.  
A warning by the NHS has been issued claiming that the UK is in the midst of a ‚Äėneurology timebomb‚Äô ‚Äď as the number of people