pcc

Misconceptions of stalking often undermine the ability of the police and prosecutors to recognise, investigate and prosecute it
UPDATE: It's Official: 200,000 People Want The Sun To Sack Katie Hopkins The press watchdog has received an unprecedented
As IPSO - the press' response to Leveson - opened for business this week, newspapers may be wondering whether they will be able to convince the public that it is not just a replica of its discredited predecessor, the Press Complaints Commission. No doubt IPSO will receive praise from newspapers themselves - at least initially. But will this be enough to paper over its shortcomings? Based on the public's response to the coverage of the Leveson Report and its implementation by the national press, the answer is no. It is highly unlikely that positive newspaper coverage will ever convince the public that IPSO is independent or effective.
Now the hacking trial verdicts have confirmed that the country's biggest newspaper company suffered a catastrophic collapse in standards, the question must be: has Rupert Murdoch done what is necessary to ensure it won't happen again? And the answer is no, he has not. In fact Murdoch has done the reverse. He has joined a conspiracy with other press bosses to prevent the changes that were demanded by the Leveson Inquiry - changes endorsed by all parties in Parliament, by victims of press abuse and by the public.
The whole of the British press - despite the fact that 95% of it was never involved in the hacking of phones which led to this crackdown - was subjected to a judicial inquiry with draconian powers, greater than those handed to the Chilcot Inquiry which is looking into the war in Iraq in which 100,000 people died... Not only has this been hugely dangerous for the press in Britain, it has robbed us of all moral authority to be able to try to help countries battling authoritarianism in establishing a free press.
Beleaguered police and crime commissioner Ann Barnes has apologised for refusing to give up her £85,000 post after a mortifying
The press watchdog has ruled that a journalist's private status update on her Facebook was a breach of the Editor's Code
A victim of a vicious stag attack has won a victory over newspapers which she said "trampled all over" her privacy by calling
From my own experience, the reality is quite different to what he portrays. Leveson has been on the minds and lips of most editors I've met. Local papers, for all their concerns about plummeting distributions and bank accounts running dry, are more wary of their ethics than ever before. One lost libel case could shut them down.
The growing number of police officers and staff, who cite devastatingly low morale within the police service as a reason why many of them are contemplating a change of job, must act as a wakeup call to the Home Secretary, PCCs and Chief Constables across the country.