post-truth

Trump is attempting to recalibrate language - ‘truth’ is less about observable facts, instead an extreme form of anti-establishment scepticism
Fake news, conspiracy theories and world leaders that lie on a daily basis are just a few of the reasons why it is important.
Questions are worth asking when articles are being written with the main intention of maximizing shares. Journalism must evolve with the times, but if we are to reach the post-post-truth era, it must do so responsibly and not let its standards fall in the process.
In Finland, financial institution, Bank of Åland, went one step further. They developed the Åland Index, a way of using data to calculate the individual carbon footprint of each credit card transaction, thus creating the first bank index for everyday environmental impact.
There is no escaping the 'post-truth' tidal wave. The rise of populist politics that has swept the US and Europe and the
The Facebook algorithm in my feed has obviously clocked my line of work, so I get sponsored posts served up to me every now and then that promise miracle, and utterly implausible, cancer cures. They are slickly professional and they look frighteningly legitimate.
In DeLillo's White Noise the narrator Gladney spends a lot of time with his academic colleague, Murray Jay Siskind, a cynical New Yorker with a penchant for constant theorising. Gladney, half-appalled, sums up his colleague's acidic take on the world: "Murray says we are fragile creatures surrounded by a world of hostile facts. Facts threaten our happiness and security."
The invention of the internet by Tim Berners-Lee in 1989 ushered an era of social media that revolutionised communications and information gathering in the world. With a click of a button or a touch of a screen one can roam around the world and connect with people, all in the palm of their hands
Democracy, fragile as it is, is held together not only through the body of laws that define democratic governance but also through the activities of a free press, which can hold power to account.
The media has been criticised for its reporting of the US presidential election campaign and the EU referendum. Several media outlets were accused of biased coverage and excessive focus on personalities rather than policies. Journalists working on these two campaigns have had to determine how to report on politicians' false claims.