postpartum

Canada's Today's Parent shows a post-birth moment between mother and child in its full un-retouched glory.
mum bod My working mum body is pure function. I no longer feel tiredness or pain in the same way (I can hold a wee through a two hour meeting whilst barely registering the discomfort) and any worries I had about my mummy tummy in formal work wear were long ago overtaken by those of leaking breasts and sneezing with a weakened pelvic floor.
Having a baby is probably one of the most life-changing events of anyone's life and although not everyone will experience the same feelings, these are common ones that I have experienced personally as well as friends and family.
Nearly nine years ago I was induced and gave birth to my son. Then he turned three. That's all I remember. I missed three years. I remember parts, but I couldn't tell you what his first words were, when he first rolled over, what his favourite food was, or what we did together.
Becoming a parent brings with it an absolute sackful of new emotions; some of which makes you feel on-top-of-the-world amazing and some just make you want to drown yourself in a bath of Cabernet Sauvignon.
I had slumped down in a chair and was unaware of the commotion, as a swarm of doctors and midwives surrounded me and hoisted me up onto a bed. A short time later, I opened my eyes to find myself breathing through an oxygen mask and shaking uncontrollably. All I could hear repeatedly were the words, 'We need blood!'
The morning after I gave birth, I got out of bed, and a cascade of wee followed. I had lost all my bladder control. It was so humiliating, and really embarrassing to try and get the nursing staff to come and clean up.
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