Public service

Construction giant's collapse exposed fundamental flaws in how government awards contracts, says committee.
The public service and administration minister says ministers have too many advisers and are not sticking to the ministerial handbook.
Although much political oxygen has been consumed by Brexit, it will be each parties’ domestic agenda which will shape the battlefield for the next General Election
Public service is a weak incentive to solve our national problems.
"One is not an honourable human being as a result of the position one occupies, but as a result of one's actions within that position."
It's time to end real terms pay cuts for all public sector workers. 5.5m hardworking public servants need it. Labour, the Lib Dems and the SNP promised it. Conservative voters want it. Her own MPs are persuaded of it. The PM should just tell the Treasury to get on with it.
In May, the people of the West Midlands will vote for their first democratically elected "Metro Mayor". This is all part
Theresa May's speech at the Tory Party Conference espousing "the good that government can do" has been interpreted as a political
These are going to be uncertain and challenging times for social enterprises and mutuals and the government must be vigilant as it settles devolution deals. We must all be wary of the unintended consequences of devolution and be careful not to undo the fantastic progress that has been made building up the social enterprise and mutual sector.
So public service mutuals are already serious players in the public service market place - but with the momentum now building (not to mention support from the incoming PM), mutuals could be set to play an even bigger role. Exciting times ahead.
The crux of it is that someone has to feel confident that they will be supported and treated fairly if they openly admit a mistake
It's not going to be a huge surprise to many people that traditional council library services are in dire straits. As funding has been squeezed, services like children's and adults' social care are naturally being prioritised over non-essential services.
I believe the next five years will see the full emergence of a new breed of individual: the Public Service Entrepreneur. These will be people who are passionate about public services but know that there is a more entrepreneurial way to get the social outcomes they are working their socks off to achieve. They don't want to submit to the unhelpful aspects of an often over-bureaucratised system, they want to by-pass it altogether and spend their time finding new ways to solve the problems of their service users.
The Government is studiously avoiding prescribing how devolution and integration should happen - but it is already clear that those who are thinking bigger than just their own local area will be more successful in their negotiations. So yes, fight for more power for your local area - but to maximise your 'devolution dividend', you must be ready to share it.
Local leaders should grab this opportunity with both hands and take advantage of the chance to used pooled budgets to properly join-up services so they make more sense to the wider public. For their part, the Government certainly don't seem to be putting any false restrictions on ambition.
The Science Museum in London is among the most popular tourist attractions in the country, but on Monday 14 July it will be opening its doors to some of the biggest arms companies and most oppressive regimes in the world.
The NHS is consistently excellent in some of what it does. Overall, as the Commonwealth Fund International Ranking testifies, it performs very well if compared to equivalent services overseas. But, there are huge unjustified regional variations in the effectiveness of the NHS within the UK in services such as the treatment of diabetes.
The taxpayer it seems, doesn't actually like privatisation very much. Successive governments have often been to the right of the taxpayer, outsourcing regardless of a public mandate, not least in the NHS.
As news spreads of how huge outsourcing companies like G4S are failing to deliver on public service contracts, a new project aims to tell the human story behind the headlines. In the last few weeks, accounts of the outsourcing giant G4S' flailing track record to deliver on public service contracts have been exploding across our newspapers, blogs and screens.
Ever since the riots blazed across UK streets and TV sets worldwide last year, debate has raged on the catalyst that sparked an estimated 15,000 individuals to become one angry mob. Around 70% of the London 2011 rioters were under the age of 24 so identifying a root cause could well help stop these scenes happening again.