queer issues

Ahmed Timol was murdered, Lichtenburg residents are furious and Cape Town is our 'healthiest' city.
But I've spent my whole working life and most of my childhood connected to live performance so I can reel off a million reasons why it matters. Recently however, one justification in particular has been at the forefront of my mind. I have been producing a new show called BULLISH with my theatre company Milk Presents.
Obviously if you say society doesn't care, one assumes you have done the research to back this up. You've read the world news sections of the papers regularly, perused academic journals on gender and sexuality, or you've at least checked Wikipedia to see which countries it is still punishable by death in if you're even thought of as being gay.
These are just some of questions that I've frequently been asked in the 34 months of my daughter's life. Despite the obvious point that they're rather personal subjects to discuss with people I often don't know very well, the topic of breastfeeding and LGBTQ families is an extremely important one.
As Stonewall once again release statistics that make chilling reading for the state of the world for young trans people, I'm once again reminded that we only tangentially live in the same world. Tell me how much time we should wait for things to get better. Tell me that this is exactly how it goes. Tell me it's unfortunate, it's really sad, but you don't really feel comfortable with this kind of chat.
So here we are, in the month of Pride all over the world. A month of declaring the rights of LGBTQIA+ people. A month of raising awareness, being visible and marching to change the world. To make the world a little more welcoming, a little more open, a little more understanding.
The last few weeks have been tough. I live with a chronic illness, a genetic liver disease called alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency
NUT have taken steps this week to introduce LGBTQIA education into the curriculum from the moment that children start school. We know, from academic theorists, researchers, and quantitative and qualitative data that a holistic approach to education is the best one - not just for children who may come to identify as LGBTQIA, but for those who will live in the world with them. Spoiler alert: that is everyone, even you. This isn't just an amazing move, it's a revolutionary one.
I was raised female in a house where Feminism wasn't a dirty word, but one to wear proudly, and while I don't feel biologically or socially that I am a woman, I will absolutely defend women's rights. These women -- from Fay Weldon to Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie -- are doing incredible, vital, and important work, but they're falling at the first hurdle into a trans-exclusionary world that only the status quo benefit from. They keep being asked how terrifying it is when the transfolk come for their pie, and the great glaring truth they're all missing is: we're not.
I did my undergraduate thesis on Section 28. I'm well-versed in queer British history. People like A.E. Dyson, Peter Tatchell, and Christine Burns are figures I'm intimately acquainted with, if only through scholarship. Tweeting inspirational LGBT people would have been too easy. So I challenged myself to find people I wasn't so familiar with.