rail renationalisation

Jeremy Corbyn is a politician in England who I believe in, which is why I then paid the extortionate and exclusive fee of £25 to vote in the second leadership election. This time I received a letter from Iain McNicol, General Secretary of The Labour Party, explaining, 'A panel of the National Executive Committee (NEC) has considered your application, and has decided to reject it on the grounds that you tweeted in support of the Green Party on 8th May 2015'.
The bookmakers have George Galloway in third place for the position of Mayor of London, which is determined by the Supplementary Vote. Neither Sadiq Khan nor Zac Goldsmith stands any realistic chance of winning outright on first preferences. They, and all other Mayoral candidates who want to win, need to start engaging with Galloway's policy proposals.
This situation cannot and should not go on. Our railways are a public service, enabling people to get to work and linking families and friends who are separated by long distances. They can, and should, be the pathways to our business success and our engagement in leisure. Instead, they are overpriced, but underfunded. Overcrowded, but understaffed. Driven by profit, not by what is best for passengers. But there is an alternative.
For obvious reasons, politicians love to claim that their policies are popular. The more they can show that they are on the side of the voters, the easier it is to win votes. Jeremy Corbyn thinks he is onto a vote-winner with his plan to renationalise Britain's railways. Is he?
Rail fares have risen nearly three times faster than wages over the past five years, leaving commuters "seriously out of
With the deadline for Labour leadership voters to register having now passed and ballots almost ready to be issued, the only question left is who the winner will be, and whether this will be former outsider Jeremy Corbyn. If he does win it will be bad not just for Labour, but for democracy as a whole.
The Green Party have a duty to continue to provide for the nation a fresh, fair and radical alternative to the 'business as usual' establishment, just as media chiefs from the BBC, ITV, SKY et al have a duty to promote and encourage a wide, engaging and relevant debate involving those extended the right to vote and elect.
We should bring franchises back into public hands as they fail or expire. To do so, we must first acknowledge our railways are a social, economic and environmental investment... Our fragmented system doesn't work. The separation of track and wheel is madness. A new rail system should be fully reunified - and half measures don't deliver.
Renationalisation. It is the rarest of policies, enjoying broad cross-voter support, whilst making economic sense. It works in Europe; it will save Britain money and ensure higher quality rail services. It's not a bold policy Ed, it should be obvious - promise to renationalise in 2015.
Britain wants renationalisation, but will the next government deliver? If that government happens to be Tory, we will only ever see an acceleration of privatisation, however a Labour government can only be guaranteed if the party chooses to embrace the policies chosen by the public.