rcn

Tales of superhuman strength, commitment and compassion have come in from far and wide. What we've found is that it's not the moments of great drama that people remember as much as the quiet moments of support, the kind words that help them to be brave.
Whichever political party triumphs in June, it is time to stop taking nursing staff for granted and start to appreciate the incredible work they do. The RCN is calling on all parties to step up and commit to the long-term funding that patients and services need.
Since the Government announced the withdrawal of student funding for would-be nurses last year, we are already hearing of a 20% drop in applications for graduate nursing courses. And the 1% pay cap on salaries is not helping to encourage people into nursing and is making existing nurses reconsider whether they can even afford to continue. If the NHS wants to achieve a clean bill of health, we need to ensure there is adequate staffing, funding, resource and education. The health of the nation is at stake.
Thank you. It's a universal phrase, used for countless reasons from passing the salt, to providing support in a time of crisis. And it means different things to different people. But as a nurse let me tell you, one small thank you can go a long way.
The Government says that the Trade Union Bill will protect essential public services. But all the evidence shows that happy, fairly treated employees produce the best work - and not just in our vital public services. This Bill will sadly make this harder and harder to achieve.
Around 7,500 nurses from the EU registered to work in the UK last year. This is an increase on the previous year, which was an increase on the year before that. Overseas nurses have played a vital role in the NHS since its inception, and will continue to do so, but clearly when trusts are relying more and more on this form of recruitment something is going wrong.
Thousands of nurses have left their homes and moved to the other side of the world, to work for the NHS in hospitals, our emergency departments and in our care homes. For the vast majority, their starting salary will be about £21,000 a year. Without them many health and social care organisations would struggle to deliver safe care. Their reward for this contribution to our health service? If they don't somehow increase their salary to £35,000 they will be forced to leave the country after six years.
Studying nursing is demanding. It can be stressful, tiring and yes, I sometimes wonder why I do it. But then something happens that rekindles the reasons why I nurse, why I love it and why it means so much to me.
Introducing regional pay and conditions in the NHS would lead to lower standards of patient care, according to The Royal
Nurses are being forced to clean toilets and mop hospital floors on top of their patient care duties, a new survey has found