religious freedom

"We don’t do gay weddings or mixed race," a woman at the venue in Booneville explained in a now-viral mobile phone video.
The immediate consequences of the US election result have been chilling. In Moscow, Beijing and Pyongyang, as well as among Islamic extremists and Burma's Buddhist nationalists, and in almost every authoritarian regime in the world, there have been celebrations. May President-elect Trump prove us all wrong...
"What is reli-gion?" Shaykh Babikir asks, his thick Sudanese accent curling the word out over his bottom lip. "Man creates
This may seem like a frivolous debate to have amidst ravaging wars across the globe and unprecedented levels of political uncertainty in Britain and across Europe but lets no longer glaze our words with honey and accept that this policing of Muslim women's attire is symptomatic of an entrenched issue France has with Islam.
Let us all, in our own ways, continue to work to ensure that the values for which Shahbaz lived, and died, did not die with him but live on, in all of us, and that those values - freedom of religion or belief for all; peace, harmony and respect between people of different faiths...
It is often forgotten in modern history classes that England is the birthplace of our modern conception of liberty. It is
Muslim scholars gathered at the summit made it clear that religious minorities living in Muslim countries must enjoy safety and security, granted by Islam, unconditionally. Conflicts, tensions and divisions amongst faiths feeding animosity must be resolved through mediation, diplomacy, and dialogue. The Charter of Medina provides an exemplary foundation for peaceful co-existence between diverse communities.
As affirmed emphatically by Islam, faith is a matter for the heart. If the so-called Muslim scholars today truly wanted to prevent apostasy, they would treat everyone - including apostates - with kindness rather than intolerance, and with love rather than vengeance.
It wouldn't be Christmas without ads for everything including food, furniture, perfume, toys, Coca-Cola, John Lewis and, of course, the Church of England. Even though we forget between Christmases, the Church of England has a long history of festive ad campaigns and this year's ad is a classic PR stunt.