remembrance

Safron Beck and Jordan Fyffe rehearse scene from IED. Photo by Kathy Trevelyan As the nation remembers the men and women
White poppies represent a commitment to peace. Most people will say they want peace, but if we really want it, we must work for it harder than we work for war. So we have no shame in saying that a white poppy demonstrates a belief in campaigning for peace and against war.
We have a choice when it comes to poppies. We have rights to freedom of expression because our ancestors campaigned for these rights (not because they were handed down to us by the establishment). We can maintain those rights only if we continue to exercise them, despite the massive social pressure to follow the establishment line. The language of "not political" is only one more aspect of the pressure to conform.
The 295 (at least) trans* people who were murdered this year alone were sons, daughters, siblings, friends, parents, students, teachers, lovers. They brought light to the dark places they stepped and their presence raised awareness. But they were deemed to be "other", to be "wrong", to be inferior and for that they were killed.
For many of us Remembrance Sunday is about reflecting on events which have passed and showing our gratitude to those who
As I went about my daily business in camp and across the no-man's land, I started dropping poppy seeds everywhere I went. I filled my pockets and sprinkled them gradually, one million seeds in total, zigzagging across the open space and throughout the narrow alleyways between tents and shelters.
While lambs' hearts, horsehair and blown glass artillery shells may seem an unlikely combination with which to spark debate around the cultural phenomena of remembrance, these are the materials I've used for my delicate Papaver rhoeas poppy sculptures, currently on show in London.
As we were united in remembrance, they were united in their sacrifice - men and women of all faiths and of none. Hundreds of thousands of Muslims, Hindus, Sikhs and people of other minority faiths have served in the British Armed Forces across two World Wars, facing down the hatred of Nazism and helping keep Britain safe in its direst hours of need.
The veteran population of the UK is declining rapidly. In 2005, there were 4.8million veterans in the UK. Today, there are 2.83million, and in 2020 there will be 2.48million. In the face of such significant demographic change, the Armed Forces charity sector will have to evolve in some fundamental ways.
Many teachers around the country are using the Sainsbury's Christmas Truce advert as a learning resource for WW1 commemorations.