rewilding

He said: “What if it had been Borth’s crocodile that escaped? Or their two lions? Their leopard almost escaped a few years
I am not talking about your utility provider, but your personal energy supply. If you are thinking along the lines of food, sleep, etc. this isn't what I mean either. I want to talk about the benefits of clean energy; inspiration and appreciation.
At the moment, 'wild' is on trend. The marketing and advertising industries have turned their eye to the romantic escape fantasies we all covet. 'Find your wild,' the advert insists, click to buy.
It's very hard to wish you all a happy new year when so many are experiencing hardship. Whether you are trying to get muddy water out of what used to be your home, digging your children out of the rubble of an air strike in Syria, fighting forest fires in drought ridden Spain, or contemplating the failed COP 21 agreement, I am thinking of you.
Even in a world where most eco-systems have been devastated and wild animals are a rarity, there are many things we can do to reconnect with nature, find purpose and feel more alive. If you feel lost, apathetic or unhappy, try to rewild yourself a little. Here are 13 easy ways you can do it without having to do anything drastic, like go and live in the woods.
Rewilding would give people the opportunity to reconnect with nature and a chance to feel the wonder that being in a wild place can evoke. This is why we should rewild the British uplands.
There's no simple answer to the philosophical and perhaps even moral question of whether in removing risk we also remove meaning from our brief, potential-filled time on this planet. I don't share my habitat with crocodiles or elephants or tigers, or even boar. But I do know that the eye of that reef shark will be etched forever in my mind, and that I can't bear the thought of a world where no creature could ever make me afraid.
I wish to narrow the focus, to explore our relationship with animals. I propose a different future: a hypothetical outlook at odds with current reality and direction. So, let us fast forward fifty years.
The greatest fear of disconnection with nature, and the widest response thus far, seems to be for children. At some point, society separates our young people from the natural world, reinforcing a doctrine that has been evolving for hundreds of years.