Royal Academy of Arts

The Duchess of Sussex attended an exhibit of artifacts and art from the Oceania region at the Royal Academy of Art. This is her first solo royal outing.
Is it possible to turn the virtual into reality? This is the theme we drew on for the Virtually Real project which will open to the public at the Royal Academy on 12th January. Faramawy, a Royal Academy Schools alumni and Jetpacks, a current student reveal our experiences creating the world's first 3D printed artwork, made in virtual reality:
If I were to describe to you images of animate skulls ravenously tearing apart a herring with their teeth, or a living skeleton
Abstract Expressionism is serious, grown-up stuff. It's about existential anxiety and overwhelming emotions. It's about death
Where to begin when you don't know where to begin... Simply put, the Abstract Expressionism show at the Royal Academy of Arts is extraordinary, utterly extraordinary. Wandering around these large galleries - the beautiful high-ceilinged walls smothered, crammed to capacity, with these vast revolutionary canvases - I felt both lost for words and completely overwhelmed.
As any art fan knows, traipsing from gallery to gallery is no walk in the park, and it takes its toll on the legs, and stomach. So here's my pick of the best Gallery Restaurants in London where you can satisfy both eyes and appetite in one go.
David Hockney. The man is practically a national treasure so it is with some trepidation, and a heavy heart, that I have to say, I'm not particularly crazy about the new show of his work at the Royal Academy.
This year, Richard Wilson, the British sculptor and Royal Academician, has coordinated a truly fantastic and exhilarating show full of dynamic, challenging works of a very high quality, and has overseen a layout that showcase them at their best - in galleries with structure and coherence.
Who was Giorgione? After all, he's hardly a household name and yet the Royal Academy has opened a new exhibition dedicated to uncovering more about him and his work. Well, this is most definitely a welcome exhibition because Giorgione was a brilliant artist in 16th Century Venice, a prodigy who died too young and whose full potential, sadly, went unfulfilled.
The Royal Academy of Arts' new blockbuster exhibition Painting the Modern Garden: Monet to Matisse, is a triumph. It examines the role gardens played in Impressionist art and, rightly, frames this genre as radical and innovative.